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At 91, Adrienne Kennedy Is Finally on Broadway. What Took So Long?

The playwright behind “Ohio State Murders,” opening this month, has a theory as to why: “It’s because I’m a Black woman.”

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Why Christmas Trees Could Cost More This Year

Inflation and tight supplies are the big reasons. Still, there are some things you can do to keep the price down and still have a natural tree.

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Inside Biden’s State Dinner: Hot Dog Talk and a Party That Lasted Until 1 A.M.

At one point, the bartenders ran out of glassware, depriving some invitees of social lubricant after years spent in a pandemic.

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Two Trump-Appointed Judges Rebuke a Third for Bending the Law in His Favor

The reversal of a district judge’s intervention in the Mar-a-Lago documents investigation shows the complexity of former President Donald J. Trump’s judicial legacy.

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Twitter Keeps Missing Its Advertising Targets as Woes Mount

Under Elon Musk, the company has cut its financial expectations as some advertisers request discounts and are offered incentives.

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Why This World Cup Is Dogged by Corruption Allegations

FIFA’s system allegedly fostered bribery, but despite years of investigations and arrests it’s still in place.

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A Life Derailed by Compulsive Lying, and More: The Week in Reporter Reads

Five articles from around The Times, narrated just for you.

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Your Holiday Rituals

Rituals make the season meaningful for many of you.

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Europe Is Wrong to Blame the U.S. for Its Energy Problems

The complaints not only are misguided but also risk aiding Vladimir Putin in his attempted conquest of Ukraine.

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We Can’t Keep Spending Like This

The party is almost over. That will have serious consequences for the U.S. economy.

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World War III Begins With Forgetting

As the last generation that remembers full-scale global war is disappearing, the United States may be stumbling into a catastrophe.

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12 Dinner Parties Around the World, From Tokyo to Paris

T dropped in on a dozen gatherings hosted by artists, designers and performers, including a conclave of celebrity look-alikes and a pizza party on a Broadway stage.

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The New York Times News Quiz, December 2, 2022

Did you follow the news this week? Take our quiz to see how well you stack up with other Times readers.

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What Makes a Movie the Greatest of All Time?

The much-respected Sight and Sound poll of the best films ever shows that what is valued onscreen has changed over time, sometimes radically.

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The Rats Are Absolutely Going to Hate the New Sanitation Commissioner

Jessica Tisch is determined to clean up New York.

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Democrats Move a Step Closer to Making South Carolina First Primary

A key panel supported President Biden’s plan, which would remove Iowa as the first presidential nominating state. States with more diverse, working-class and in some cases more moderate constituencies are being elevated.

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These Georgia Precincts Were Red. Then Blue. Now They Are Purple.

This small collection of precincts has backed both Democrats and Republicans in recent elections and could be the most competitive areas in Georgia.

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Druggings, Deaths and Robberies Put New York’s Gay Community on Edge

At first, the men’s deaths were treated as overdoses, until tens of thousands of dollars were found drained from their bank accounts.

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A Drummer Showing the Way to ‘the Freest Musical Universe’

Miguel Tomasín, one of the few professional musicians with Down syndrome, has brought attention to the artistic visions of people with developmental disabilities, with his band releasing over 100 albums.

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Spot the Ball

We’re through the group stage at the World Cup in Qatar, and we’ve seen magical goals, phantom fouls and the heartbreak of teams being eliminated from competition. Before we advance, let’s look at some photos of the action from the Cup’s early games. To make them more interesting, we’ve removed the ball. See if you can guess where it was.

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The U.S. Met Expectations in the Group Stage. Now, It Hopes to Exceed Them.

The Americans face the Dutch as underdogs Saturday. But as the U.S. captain, Tyler Adams, said about this World Cup, “A lot of teams that might be underdogs in these games have come out on top.”

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U.S. Sees Little Prospect for Ukraine Talks With Putin After Biden Offer

The Kremlin reaffirmed a stance that both Washington and Kyiv find unacceptable, and U.S. officials said Mr. Biden’s position had not changed.

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Scarred by War, a Ukrainian Children’s Choir Finds Hope in Music

Members of the Shchedryk Children’s Choir have emerged from conflict determined to sing, including at Carnegie Hall this weekend.

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He Returned a Dazed Soldier to the Russians. Ukraine Calls It Treason.

No one knew what to do with a lost Russian pilot who suddenly appeared in the occupied city of Kherson. The case has revealed the blurred line between pragmatism in a war zone and collaboration with the enemy.

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Defaults Loom as Poor Countries Face an Economic Storm

Debt-relief efforts are stalling as developing economies are being hit by higher interest rates, a strong dollar and slowing global growth.

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After Fanning Covid Fears, China Must Now Try to Allay Them

Beijing had long warned that the only effective response was testing, quarantine and lockdowns. As it shifts policy, it must change how it portrays the risks.

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Masks Off, Wallets Out: Art Basel 2022

On the 20th anniversary of Art Basel Miami Beach, its largest edition yet, the two Miamis — its emerging artists and its big collectors — meet across the gap.

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Wanted: N.Y.C. Rat Overlord With ‘Killer Instinct.’ Will Pay $170,000.

The city is seeking a new director of rodent mitigation to tackle a task that many mayoral administrations have futilely taken on before.

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Mauna Loa Eruption Threatens a Famous Climate Record

The record is credited by many scientists as the most important evidence that the climate is changing because of human activity.

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Appeals Court Scraps Special Master Review in Trump Documents Case

The panel’s decision removed a major obstacle to the Justice Department’s investigation into Mr. Trump’s handling of sensitive government documents.

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Germans Have Seen the Future, and It’s a Heat Pump

The boxy machines look and function like large air-conditioners on reverse, but Germans hope they hold the key to Europe’s push for fossil-free heating.

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How Herschel Walker Could Win Georgia’s Senate Race

Despite all the tough headlines, he could prevail. Here are two theories about how the runoff could unfold.

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Elon’s Two-Day War with Apple + How to Beat an A.I. Censor + S.B.F.’s ‘Bad Month’

Musk takes on tech’s fight against the Apple “tax.”

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Who Pays the Bill for Climate Change?

A plan led by Barbados could remake the way the world of finance deals with the climate crisis.

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Population Growth Is Making Hurricanes More Expensive

The 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, which ended this week, was one of the most destructive on record.

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A Conservative’s Take on the Chaotic State of the Republican Party

National Review writer Michael Brendan Dougherty talks about the ‘vacuum of authority’ the G.O.P. must face.

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If It Was Good Enough for Socrates, It’s Good Enough for Sophomores

Bring the oral exam back to college.

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What White Voters See in Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker is a part of a long tradition of Black people willing to distance themselves from their community for white praise and white power.

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Can America Really Envision World War III?

As the last generation that remembers full-scale global war is disappearing, the United States may be stumbling into a catastrophe.

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36 Hours in Rome

The Eternal City is getting a refresh, with new restaurants and hotels, sumptuous art palaces and innovative ways to see ancient sites.

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How Do Designers Decorate for the Holidays? We Invited Ourselves Over to See.

There’s no right way to decorate for whatever holidays you celebrate. But it never hurts to borrow some ideas from the pros. (Especially that gumdrop tree.)

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Applying to College, and Trying to Appear ‘Less Asian’

The affirmative action lawsuit against Harvard seemed to confirm advice given for years to Asian Americans: Don’t play chess, don’t check the box declaring race.

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At the State Dinner, Jill Biden Revives the Oscar de la Renta Tradition

The first lady returns to a tentpole of White House image-making.

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The Full Guest List for the State Dinner

More than 300 guests were invited, including government officials, French fashion designers, actors and big donors.

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Biden and Macron Toast Their Alliance With Lobster and American-Made Cheese

The black-tie state dinner marked a return of diplomatic pomp and an effort by the United States and France to display the strength of their alliance after a trans-Atlantic dust-up.

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How Hospitals Respond When Mentally Ill People Come in From the Streets

More people with severe mental illness may soon arrive in New York City’s emergency rooms. What happens to them next?

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Biden Signs Legislation to Avert Nationwide Rail Strike

President Biden had called on Congress to act, saying a rail strike would “devastate our economy.”

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The Giant World Cup Rookie and an Enduring Dutch Mystery

The Netherlands is Europe’s most reliable talent factory. Unless you need a goalkeeper.

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Can Brazil’s Divisive Team Unite a Fractured Nation?

Brazil’s World Cup team has become a political lightning rod at home after an ugly election. A championship might be the only thing that can bring Brazil together.

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Kanye West Is Suspended From Twitter After Posting a Swastika

The tweet was deleted before the rapper’s account was shut down. Twitter’s chief executive, Elon Musk, said the post violated a rule against inciting violence.

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Hate Speech’s Rise on Twitter Is Unprecedented, Researchers Find

Problematic content and formerly barred accounts have increased sharply in the short time since Elon Musk took over, researchers said.

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OPEC and Russia to Meet as Global Forces Weigh on Oil Market

As the West moves to intercede in oil trading, OPEC Plus, led by Saudi Arabia, is expected to protect its own interests.

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Shadowy Arm of a German State Helped Russia Finish Nord Stream 2

The threat of U.S. sanctions jeopardized completion of a second direct gas pipeline from Russia. So Gazprom and German officials concocted a phony climate foundation to get the job done.

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Alex Jones Files for Bankruptcy

The Infowars broadcaster has been ordered by courts to pay about $1.5 billion in damages to Sandy Hook families hurt by his promotion of conspiracy theories.

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How China’s Police Used Phones and Faces to Track Protesters

After a weekend of protests, the authorities in China are using the country’s all-seeing surveillance apparatus to find those bold enough to defy them.

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As Officials Ease Covid Restrictions, China Faces New Pandemic Risks

Huge swaths of the nation’s elderly remain vulnerable, scientists say, and a surge in deaths and hospitalizations may be inevitable.

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Why Are Middle-Aged Men Missing From the Labor Market?

Men ages 35 to 44 are staging a lackluster rebound from pandemic job loss, despite a strong economy.

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It’s All That Young Job Seekers Are Asking For: Stability

People entering the work force amid inflation, pandemic uncertainty and layoffs are recalibrating what a dream job looks like.

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The Museum of Broadway Is Open. Here Are 10 Highlights.

In Times Square, a 26,000-square-foot space details the history of theater with objects like Patti LuPone’s “Evita” wig, a Jets jacket from “West Side Story” and more.

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Black Turnout in Midterms Was One of the Low Points for Democrats

But the effects of the decrease wound up being muted.

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Inflation in Eurozone Slows as Energy Prices Ease, but Officials Remain Wary

Consumer prices rose at an annual rate of 10 percent in November, down from 10.6 percent a month earlier, the first moderation in 18 months.

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What to Know About Herschel Walker’s Residency Status in Georgia

The Republican Senate candidate listed his Atlanta residence on public records as a rental property in 2021, while receiving a homestead exemption in Texas.

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U. S. to Pay Millions to Move Tribes Threatened by Climate Change

Two tribes in Alaska and a third in Washington State will get $25 million each to retreat to higher ground.

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Plastic Off the Sofa

“Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” doesn’t shy away from big subjects like grief and colonization. The hosts of “Still Processing” are ready for it.

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Elon Musk Is Finding Out That Free Speech Isn’t Rocket Science

It’s harder.

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China’s Dramatic Dissent

The unrest that has swept across the country is a rare public challenge to the world’s most powerful authoritarian government.

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How to Perform Normalcy — and Why the Democrats Should Give It a Try

Bhaskar Sunkara and Michelle Cottle look to the Democratic Party’s future.

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How a ‘Golden Era for Large Cities’ Might Be Turning Into an ‘Urban Doom Loop’

What seemed like a transitory step to avoid infection has become a major force driving the future direction of urban America.

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The Text Messages From Desperate Afghans Left Behind: ‘Show This to the People of America’

More than a year after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, a network of volunteers is still trying to evacuate Afghan allies. But this commitment has come at a great cost.

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The Table for Trump’s Antisemitic Banquet Was Set Long Ago

Republicans have accepted his “textbook” racism for years.

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‘Avatar’ and the Mystery of the Vanishing Blockbuster

It was the highest-grossing film in history, but for years it was remembered mainly for having been forgotten. Why?

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Where Cowboys Fly and Cattle Set Sail: An Epic Food Journey

Exporting live cattle from northern Australia to Indonesia has created a unique culture, both a throwback and a modern marvel of globalization.

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Is Spreading Medical Misinformation a Doctor’s Free Speech Right?

Two lawsuits in California have pre-emptively challenged a new law that would punish doctors for misleading patients about Covid-19.

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Best Jazz Albums of 2022

In a year of growth and reflection, the music stretched and relocated in often unpredictable ways.

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Best Albums of 2022

The most effective artists of the year weren’t afraid to root around deep inside and boldly share the messiness, the complexities and the beauty of their discoveries.

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen will speak at a critical moment for the global economy.

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Top Questions for Today’s DealBook Summit Speakers

Andrew will interview Janet Yellen, Volodymyr Zelensky, Mark Zuckerberg, Andy Jassy, Ben Affleck and many more.

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When the Abortion Clinic Came to Town

After Roe fell, a sleepy college town in southern Illinois found itself to be a crucial destination for abortion access. Not all of its residents are happy about it.

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World Cup 2022: How Teams Can Advance to the Round of 16

An overview of the scenarios describing how all 32 teams can advance to the knockout round.

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Watch Christian Pulisic Send the U.S. Past Iran and Into the Knockout Rounds

See how Christian Pulisic scored the U.S. goal before leaving with an injury in a 1-0 win against Iran.

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Christian Pulisic, on the Mend, Says He’ll Play on Saturday

Pulisic was injured scoring the winning goal for the U.S. against Iran on Tuesday.

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When V.I.P. Isn’t Exclusive Enough: Welcome to V.V.I.P.

Every sports venue has its own tiered system of luxury. The World Cup in Qatar is providing a reminder that there is always a higher level.

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A Snapshot of Homelessness Policies Around the U.S. and the World

New York City officials plan to remove mentally ill people from streets and subways. Here’s a quick look at how other cities and countries approach the issue of support for homeless people.

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On City Streets, Fear and Hope as Mayor Launches Push To Remove Mentally Ill

Mayor Eric Adams intends to remove people with severe, untreated mental illness from the streets. That will mean involuntary hospitalization of people deemed unable to care for themselves.

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New York City to Remove Mentally Ill People From Streets Against Their Will

Mayor Eric Adams directed the police and emergency medical workers to hospitalize people they deemed too mentally ill to care for themselves, even if they posed no threat to others.

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Oath Keepers Leader Convicted of Sedition in Landmark Jan. 6 Case

A jury in federal court in Washington convicted Stewart Rhodes, the leader of the far-right militia, and one of his subordinates for a plot to keep Donald Trump in power.

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Jiang Zemin, Leader Who Guided China Into Global Market, Dies at 96

Mr. Jiang, a wily and garrulous politician, presided over a decade of meteoric economic growth in the post-Tiananmen era.

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What It’s Like Inside One of China’s Protests

A look at the demonstrations sweeping the country and what they mean for its “zero-Covid” policy.

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Residents and Police Face Off in China’s Latest Protests

Although security forces have reasserted control in many cities, rebellions against Beijing’s strict Covid rules have rocked the southern city of Guangzhou this week.

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The Long Odds Facing China’s Protesters

Popular protests are more easily begun than ever before, but they are more likely to dissipate, too.

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‘Breach of the Big Silence’: Protests Stretch China’s Censorship to Its Limits

Days later, videos of chants and confrontations are still visible on the Chinese internet. It’s a sign of how a groundswell outmatched the world’s best internet control system.

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Soledad O’Brien’s Painted Hardwood Floors Spark Debate on a New Trend

The broadcast journalist recently painted the floors of her Florida bungalow. Some people loved the idea; others hated it.

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Small Plane Crashes Into Transmission Tower in Maryland

Rescuers on Sunday night worked carefully to extricate the two people on board, after 117,000 were at one point without power. Photos showed the plane entangled in power lines.

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Once a Star of College Basketball, Kevin Ollie Is Now Disrupting It

Since winning his lawsuit against the university he coached to a national championship, Ollie has found purpose running an upstart pro league.

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Have the Anticapitalists Reached Harvard Business School?

Social justice joins discounted cash flows on the syllabus as essential knowledge for aspiring corporate leaders.

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Brooklyn D.A. Assigns 1 in 5 Workers to Fight Violence Against Women

A new division will be created in a major restructuring meant to streamline complex cases against abusers. It’s part of a national trend.

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The Science of Comfort Food

Much of the joy we get from our favorite dishes stems from the memories we associate with them.

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A Holiday Gift Guide

It’s Black Friday, the unofficial start of the year-end shopping season. We’ve got ideas for stuff that isn’t stuff.

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Qatar’s Big Bet on the World Cup

How a tiny nation ended up hosting the single largest sporting event on the planet — and at what cost.

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Pandemic Learning Loss

The role remote education played.

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